Snowden

(2016)

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Title:
Snowden
Release Date:
15th September 2016
Runtime:
134 min
MPAA Rating:
R
Genres:
Directors:
Oliver Stone
Writers:
Kieran Fitzgerald, Oliver Stone
Languages:
N/A
Stream Quality:
1080p / 720p / 480p

Storyline

Academy Award (R)-winning director Oliver Stone, who brought Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July, Wall Street and JFK to the big screen, tackles the most important and fascinating true story of the 21st century. Snowden, the politically-charged, pulse-pounding thriller starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Shailene Woodley, reveals the incredible untold personal story of Edward Snowden, the polarizing figure who exposed shocking illegal surveillance activities by the NSA and became one of the most wanted men in the world. He is considered a hero by some, and a traitor by others. No matter which you believe, the epic story of why he did it, who he left behind, and how he pulled it off makes for one of the most compelling films of the year.

Ratings

Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 62%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience 75%
IMDb Rating 7.3

Casts

Jaymes Butler as Drill Sergeant
Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Edward Snowden
Melissa Leo as Laura Poitras
Robert Firth as Dr. Stillwell
Zachary Quinto as Glenn Greenwald

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by rysmith25 17th September, 2016

Snowden was a Patriot

I don't understand people that complain about this movie. There is zero to complain about in this movie. You got to wonder if the low reviews are government paid employees or just Oliver Stone haters. I couldn't keep my eyes off the screen. I was mesmerized from the beginning of the film until the end. I honestly had no idea it ran two hours and 20 minutes. A movie is never too long if you don't look at your phone and check the time. Myself, nor did anyone in the theater once look down at their phone. The movie had great cinematography, excellent pacing, strong emotional dialogue, and solid character/relationship arcs. You can't ask for much more of a drama based on a true story. Excellent job Oliver. Welcome back! The truth is people don't want to hear it. If it doesn't directly affect their cozy iPhone streaming lives, than they don't want to hear about it. They don't want to hear that they are wage slaves. They don't want to hear that there is no such thing as privacy in this country. They don't want to hear that the government isn't a democracy. People don't want to hear that the American government isn't a government at all, and that it's been replaced by a multi-national fortunate 100 corporate conglomeration funded by the international banking cartel. People don't want to know the truth. I'd venture a guess that most of the people that rated this movie poorly didn't even see the movie. These are the same people that can't handle the truth. Open your eyes people. Don't be another corporate wage slave.

Reviewed by Peter Titan 16th September, 2016

Excellent movie, well worth the price of admission.

Very well made movie, very well acted, and directed. Going in I was worried that the movie would turn into an action thriller or a love story that would cloud what really happened. I was pleasantly surprised to find a step by step account of real events with a deep look at what goes on behind the scenes at the various spy agencies. Personally I would have liked a little more time spent on the politicians (and other behind the scenes players) and how they acted before and after the Snowden revelations, but maybe that's a topic for another movie… I would recommend this movie to anyone interested in modern history and geopolitics…

Reviewed by theoryneutral 13th September, 2016

Oliver Stone Served his Country

I have to save the 10/10 for those that deserve it and this one does. I saw this at the opening in Toronto and came into it with a critical eye, having seen Citizen Four and having profound knowledge of the events that unfolded throughout the story recounted in this film. Others in the audience weren't sure if all the shocking events in the film actually happened, so it's possible the public at large will never actually know just how accurate this film was. I was taken aback by Oliver Stone's faithfulness to the facts. Nothing was distorted or sacrificed for entertainment value, and yet it was immensely rich in the latter, as well. Snowden Portrayal: Excellent acting, understated--just like Snowden. Greenwald Portrayal: Brilliant acting, and sometimes I got the eerie feeling I was actually watching Greenwald, though the role was perhaps a little too emotional at times when the real Greenwald would have kept his composure. It happens. Laura Poitras: It was justice that Stone actually gave her character a role in the film, since Laura herself never does, and she deserves credit for what she has done. Oliver Stone served his country in making this film and by doing justice to the bravery of Snowden. We should all thank both. Perhaps the world will be more inclined to listen once this film is available to all.

Reviewed by www.ramascreen.com 11th September, 2016

Riveting! Joseph Gordon-Levitt gives an Oscar-worthy performance.

The great director who's not afraid to tackle matters of war, conspiracy and controversial American political issues, has returned. Only this time, Oliver Stone has upgraded his latest film's look and tone to make it seem more digitally advanced, which is fine because it fits the story of Edward Snowden and we're living in this day and age where every millennial's favorite series happens to be "Mr. Robot." SNOWDEN, as you've guessed it, is a thriller about the whistleblower and former intelligence contractor, Edward Snowden, played in this film by the talented Joseph Gordon-Levitt. "Divergent" star, Shailene Woodley plays his girlfriend, Lindsay Mills, who stays by his side through his ordeals of working for the government due to his patriotism while at the same time feeling conflicted about how the government runs its methods in the name of national security. This film dramatizes the events that led Snowden to becoming one of the most wanted men in the world. First, I have to give praises to Joseph Gordon-Levitt who I think went above and beyond in not only capturing Edward Snowden's mannerism and the way he speaks but my goodness, Gordon-Levitt's performance in this film is so calculating and precise, you can see his brains constantly work itself out, just by looking at him. And Shailene Woodley gives her most mature performance yet, because this film is more than just about the whole surveillance controversy, it's also about how that negatively affects Snowden & Mills relationship and I think it's fairly handled, both aspects don't take away or diminish each other's importance in the process. When it comes to the film's dramatizing the U.S. and British global surveillance program, I'm sure there'll be questions as to how authentic the portrayal is, as far as the headquarters are concerned, for example, some may see it as a bit too much like a Bond villain's secret lair, but you'll be entertained by some of the visual effects that the film applies to showcase hacking and how one person can connect to another person and to another person and what's most fascinating about it is that there's a programmer watching the whole thing the entire time. So SNOWDEN is essentially part conspiracy thriller, part relationship drama, and to a certain extent, part heist. Overall, I think it's a riveting film that keeps you engaged and more importantly gets you thinking, which I think is the goal of Oliver Stone's movies. Does the film lean one way in that it paints Edward Snowden as a hero? I think so, but not in a way that intentionally judges those who at the end still think of him as a traitor. SNOWDEN might cause audiences to become more paranoid or it might cause audiences to start supporting any effort to hold our government accountable. The jury's still out. -- Rama's Screen --

Reviewed by DusterPan 10th September, 2016

Reflection of my expectations

Arguing about gender identity and racial issues completely misses the substance, the real issues of what happens when we let government expand it's powers under the pretext of terrorism, after a tragedy that shut down all thinking. Powered by genuine fear of terrorists created as a result of imperialistic and abusive foreign policy, the American public has ignored waste of tens of billions of tax-dollars that could've been spent on health care, infrastructure and education. Developed in secrecy, perfected on 'worthless' Muslims in Middle-East, everything from surveillance blimps to state-sponsored malware is now rapidly being deployed in homeland: US is being torn apart not just by racial issues, but by the ever increasing wealth gap, the scale of which according to a recent study, most American haven't even got a clear understanding of. Privatized industry funded with tax-payer money without the *informed* consent of citizens has turned into legal theft. Snowden was part of that system, but in a unique way; He worked in a position where he saw far beyond the standard compartmentalization. He wasn't Alice developing metadata collection program. He wasn't Bob creating target automation. He wasn't Charlie building drones. He wasn't David confirming kills. He was Edward who saw NSA's SKYNET program, a real tool used to automate drone murders with surveillance metadata. Saying it took guts to blow whistle on corruption within the world's largest intelligence establishment is a complete understatement. While some people like Silas Davis here seem to think no large terrorist attacks must mean mass surveillance, works, The Intercept has done extensive reporting on how not only this is false, but that FBI has had to provide resources on troubled people just to get them arrested. Privacy is a universal human right, but having to hand it away for the sake of security reduces it to a a mere privilege. What makes it even more ridiculous is the transparency in society has completely reversed it's state: Citizens are monitored to the point where gerrymandering strips their only power -- their vote. Meanwhile government the power of which is derived from the governed has secret court, secret laws and secret interpretations of these laws. In such situation "I have nothing to hide" is either badly placed trust or a coping mechanism. The revelations by Snowden were made possible by decades long effort by the cypherpunk community, that has developed encryption tools from Tor-network to PGP-emails to OTR-instant messaging that Poitras, Greenwald and Snowden actually used to empower themselves during 2013. Citizenfour documentary honored these projects during credits. Information security allowed by the law, and achieved with sophisticated technology is extremely important. Terrorism isn't the number one threat, cyber attacks are. The Snowden documents have revealed how NSA has injected back doors into hardware, bribed companies like RSA to use back doored random number generators, and weakened industry standards in an attempt to monitor everything. In reality they've made much easier for all cyber terrorists and foreign governments to hack vital systems that belong to government and companies, and that maintain the critical infrastructure. How well the movie grasps over all this, we'll see soon. The 10 goes just for increasing the awareness. Meanwhile, I suggest the conversation be steered towards the real issues instead of feeding trolls.