John Wick: Chapter 2

(2017)

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Title:
John Wick: Chapter 2
Release Date:
9th February 2017
Runtime:
122 min
MPAA Rating:
R
Genres:
Directors:
Chad Stahelski
Writers:
Derek Kolstad
Languages:
English
Stream Quality:
1080p / 720p / 480p

Storyline

John Wick is forced out of retirement by a former associate looking to seize control of a shadowy international assassins’ guild. Bound by a blood oath to aid him, Wick travels to Rome and does battle against some of the world’s most dangerous killers.

Ratings

Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 90%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience 93%
IMDb Rating 8.5

Casts

Common as Cassian
Ian McShane as Winston
Keanu Reeves as John Wick
Riccardo Scamarcio as Santino D'Antonio
Ruby Rose as Ares

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Akram 9th February, 2017

It's a blood oath and bloodbath,oh it's bloody alright

Let me be honest,this is my first ever review. Just felt compelled to do so since this film is what we can call a sequel. If it's not better,then it certainly filled the shoes of its predecessor. The action sequences are better, choreographed so well that it felt authentic. The killings are logical, even though at some points the bad guys became generic henchmen who can't shoot straight. But the world created for this sequel is fascinating in every way, making it impossible not to like the things that happened throughout the movie. Tldr, if you like the first one, then it's a no brainer for this next chapter. And sharpen your pencil, you'll need it.

Reviewed by www.ramascreen.com 6th February, 2017

Hardcore! Keanu Reeves is relentless

"John Wick: Chapter 2" is first true great action movie of the year. Bigger and better. It takes everything you enjoyed about the previous film to a whole other level of excitement. For lack of a better word, it's f***ing hardcore. There's something beautiful about the scope, the choreography and the thrill of this film's violence, you just can't get enough of it. And Keanu Reeves is relentless. In this sequel, John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is forced back out of retirement by a former associate plotting to seize control of a shadowy international assassins' guild. As you fans of the first film would know that there's a mythology, a secret underworld created for this and so the sequel reveals the wide reach of its extent. It goes global. Reeves is bound by a marker, a debt he made in the past, so he travels to Rome to pay it but in doing so squares off against some of the world's deadliest killers. I think one of the things that makes "John Wick: Chapter 2" effective is that many of the creative talents return, and screenwriter Derek Kolstad doesn't rehash the first film, which is usually a mistake done by many sequels out there. They take John Wick to international stage this time around but this film is not about 'hey look we're setting him somewhere else,' it's still character-based, it's about this assassin who struggles between living by his code and wanting to leave this whole once and for all. And this is every action fan's wet-dream, to tell you the truth because you have a character who basically can use anything, whatever he gets his hands on, to kill. So what you see is once again a mix of martial art and gunplay or gun-fu, and on top of that, you also get to see him use a car as weapon, for example. No shortage of surprises in "John Wick: Chapter 2." The fight choreographies are some of the most complex I've seen on the big screen, definitely the most badass since "The Raid," kudos to the stunt coordinators and also to the actors themselves who are committed to making those sequences look and feel like the perfect bloody dance. In "John Wick: Chapter 2" the mythology expands and becomes multi-layered, this whole secret society of assassins is irresistible, luxurious, sexy, and lethal. It's so cool that pretty much anybody, any character, on the streets can be a potential assassin, you just never know who might launch at John Wick at any time. With John Wick, Keanu Reeves has found his latest iconic character, in addition to Neo, and Keanu delivers him like it's nobody business, tactical and precise. "John Wick: Chapter 2" is how action sequels should be made.

Reviewed by nsharath009 6th February, 2017

Boogeyman AKA Baba Yaga is back with more action

"John Wick" wasn't designed for a sequel. It began with someone killing John Wick's dog, and ended with the vengeance-bent uber- assassin stealing a new best friend from an animal shelter, after dropping 76 (or more) dead bodies along the way. The movie, which launched the directorial career of Keanu Reeve's stunt double in "The Matrix," Chad Stahelski, succeeded not on the strength of its story, but on the elegance of its action, and while it reaches at times to justify its own existence, "John Wick: Chapter 2" boasts a reunion with "Matrix" co-star Laurence Fishburne and two major improvements on the original: First, no animals were harmed in the making of the film. And secondly, the human body count is significantly higher. If the latter detail offends your humanistic sensibilities, then this isn't the franchise for you. Even for "Grand Theft Auto" junkies and those at the other end of the spectrum, it can actually get tiresome watching Wick eliminate a seemingly inexhaustible stream of henchmen at times. But there's a quality to the violence here that elevates it above the literal (and reprehensible) nihilism of movies like last year's "Hardcore Henry," and instead achieves something more akin to dance. The John Wick movies accomplish what Hong Kong action flicks did a quarter-century ago, seducing bloodthirsty (predominately male) audiences into appreciating an exquisitely choreographed modern ballet. If you doubt that Stahelski sees his own job in these terms, look no further than how he lights each scene: Even neon demon Nicolas Winding Refn must be taking notes at the way Stahelski and his crew place bright-fuchsia fluorescent tubes in a New York subway, poltergeist- blue spotlights beneath the arches of ancient Roman catacombs, and nightclub-worthy accents throughout an elaborate hall of mirrors art exhibit. In the opening scene, a Russian crime tsar (Peter Stormare) reminds us of Wick's ruthless boogeyman reputation, and after Wick retrieves his stolen 1969 Mustang and knocks off another dozen or so of his men, he brokers a truce that puts the vendetta of the first movie to rest. Rules matter to the criminals in Wick's world, and even he is bound by them, lest he find himself outside the protection of the Continental — a secret network of assassins dreamed up by screenwriter Derek Kolstad for the original. Recognizing that the Continental was effectively what distinguished "John Wick" from nearly all the other revenge sagas out there, Kolstad has decided to elaborate on its mythology this time around, expanding the homicidal fraternity beyond a single New York hotel to an international organization governed by its own sort of omerta. Rule No. 1, "No blood on Continental grounds," serves to protect bitter rivals, the way "base" does in grade-school games of tag. Rule No. 2, "Every marker must be honored," explains why Wick can't retire just yet: In order to leave the organization, he pledged to fulfill one last favor when asked. And now, his marker has come due. Wick's debt drags him into the middle of a power play for a seat at the High Table, a council of international super-criminals in which Italian playboy Santino D'Antonio (the impeccably dressed Riccardo Scamarcio) wants the spot held by his sister Gianna (Claudia Gerini), and orders Wick to eliminate her. It's a job that Wick describes as "impossible," but actually proves to be remarkably easy (she actually does the deed for him) — until he tries to escape, only to be cornered by both Gianna's bodyguard (Common) and D'Antonio's henchmen. Perhaps the Continental ought to consider a third rule: Contract holders can't snuff the assassins they engage, or vice verse. No sooner the task been competed than D'Antonio issues an open contract on Wick, which goes out wide to every assassin in the world (none of whom keep their cell phones on silent), making for an amusing montage as Stahelski reveals just how far the Continental's network extends. With the exception of one returning character, a look-the- other-way local cop played by Thomas Sadoski, every speaking role is held by someone related in one way or another to this vast underground organization, though some — like the Orthodox Jewish banker who watches over his safety deposit box, or the "sommelier" who deals guns as if they were fine wines — wouldn't dream of turning a weapon on Wick. Ironically, the John Wick introduced at the outset of this movie sincerely believes he's done with violence. Except we're dealing with Keanu Reeves here, and though he's acrobatic enough to meet the physical demands of the role, the actor has never in his career managed to convey complex emotion: In this case, Reeves' version of extreme reluctance looks more like mild constipation, never more pronounced than in the scene where he makes a decision to violate the Continental's most important rule, knowing full well it will leave him "excommunicado" (a silly word rendered menacing by hotel manager Ian McShane). That said, it might be even more amusing if he'd gotten himself kicked out for overstepping one of the hotel's unwritten restrictions — specifically, its no-dogs policy.

Reviewed by crytoy 1st February, 2017

A Masterpiece !

To put it simply, the movie is fascinating, exciting and fantastic. The dialog, the fight choreography, the way the story moves, the characters charisma, all and much more are combined together to deliver this masterpiece. Such an amazing flow, providing a fusion between the 90s and the new century, it's like the assassins are living in another world, with another mindset, without people understanding it. Just one advice for you though: Don't build an expectation of what you want to watch in this movie, if you do, then you will ruin it. This movie has it's own flow and movement, so watch it with a clear mind, and have fun.

Reviewed by Brands . 31st January, 2017

John Wick is coming for you with his gun and pencil

John Wick 2 is a great sequel that wasn't underwhelming it produced great action scenes great performances and there wasn't a dull moment in sight, its more fast paced than the first but all in good favor, Keanu Reeves gives it his all and adds a lot to these movies I'm hopeful that this continues on to be a great franchise, we got are first peek into the mob underworld in the first movie and in this movie its more fleshed and we get to know more about wick as the story progresses as I said it adds more to the story in every aspect which is to be praised. I also believe that the action set pieces in this movie topped its predecessor with stunts where you tilt your head in amazement. Only negatives sometimes the movie doesn't take time to stop and let you have a breather but otherwise its a very impressive movie with great acting, story and action sequences. JOHN WICK YOUR NOT VERY GOOD AT RETIRING!!